The Unity Project

Art that Inspires us to VOTE.

The Unity Project calls upon all Americans to uphold democracy by voting.

This dynamic digital poster campaign aims to inspire citizens to vote. Striking images by the nation’s top illustrators work to establish unity and belonging among all Americans, who share in common the right to elect a government of the people.

Norman Rockwell Museum steps into the public square in a new way with a unification project in support of democracy—a rally to vote campaign highlighting original concepts by six leading contemporary illustrators commissioned by the Museum to create motivational art in the great illustrated poster tradition.

Compelling works by Mai Ly Degnan, Rudy Gutierrez, Anita Kunz, Tim O’Brien, Whitney Sherman, and Yuko Shimizu reflect each artist’s personal voice and a diverse range of artistic approaches.

Mai Ly Degnan: Defend Democracy
Mai Ly Degnan

Defend Democracy, 2020

Rudy Gutierrez: Humanity, Not Politics
Rudy Gutierrez

Humanity, Not Politics, 2020

Anita Kunz: Every Vote Counts
Anita Kunz

Every Vote Counts, 2020

Tim O'Brien: Vote
Tim O’Brien

Vote, 2020

Whitney Sherman: Vote - Defend Democracy

Whitney Sherman
Vote: Defend Democracy, 2020

Yuko Shimizu: Defend Democracy - Vote
Yuko Shimizu

Defend Democracy (Lady Liberty), 2020

An art and civics initiative of the Museum, The Unity Project puts illustration art to work for social good in the public commons. The program is inspired by Norman Rockwell’s Four Freedoms and civil rights era images which mobilized citizen action for social change.

The Campaign reminds us that the Constitution gives power to the people, and will reinforce our citizen agency, the common bond in our democracy which gives the power to the people to elect their government, government of, by, and for the people.

The Unity Project carves out a new space for the Museum’s work in the world, to uphold social justice through illustration art. We hope it inspires citizens across the nation to vote.

Norman Rockwell: Imagining Freedom

American illustrators have a long tradition of observing and responding to the world around them. Strong images can shape perception and help us envision and work toward aspirational ideals.

Artworks created to bring out the vote in 2020 will become part of Norman Rockwell: Imagining Freedom, and exhibition returning to Stockbridge following a six city tour that has taken Rockwell’s art and the work of other creators to New York, Detroit, Washington DC, Normandy, France, Houston, and Denver, Norman Rockwell: Imagining Freedom explores the indelible odyssey of the Four Freedoms, humanity’s greatest and most elusive ideals.

Freedom of Speech
Norman Rockwell (1894-1978)

Freedom of Speech, 1943.

Freedom of Workship
Norman Rockwell (1894-1978)

Freedom of Workship, 1943.

Freedom From Want
Norman Rockwell (1894-1978)

Freedom From Want, 1943.

Freedom From Fear
Norman Rockwell (1894-1978)

Freedom From Fear, 1943.

The power of images to shape cultural narratives is revealed in this dynamic and evolving exhibition, which invites viewers to trace the origins and legacy of the Four Freedoms from the trials of the Great Depression and World War II to the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s, and the call for freedom today across racial, gender, ethnic, and religious lines. Norman Rockwell: Imagining Freedom inspires conversation about our most pressing social concerns through the lens of art and history, and invites us to consider how we can become allies in the creation of a more humane world.

Norman Rockwell. (1894-1978)

Rosie the Riveter, 1943.

Golden Rule
Norman Rockwell (1894-1978) 

Golden Rule, 1961.

The Problem We All Live With
Norman Rockwell (1894-1978)

The Problem We All Live With, 1963.

Rockwell’s most iconic works, including the legendary Four Freedoms paintings inspired by Franklin D. Roosevelt’s vision for a peaceful post-war world; the artist’s personal plea for unity in The Golden Rule; his call for human rights in The Problem We All Live With and Murder in Mississippi; and his petition for truth and transparency in The Right to Know reflect the artist’s desire to make a difference. More than forty Rockwell artworks are joined by paintings, drawings, photography, and writings of artists working across the decades for the cause of freedom, including Dorothea Lange, Gordon Parks, Arthur Rothstein, Mead Schaeffer, Arthur Szyk, Martha Sawyers, Langston Hughes, Thomas Lea, Boris Artzybasheff, and Denys Wortman, among others. Reimagining the Four Freedoms, a multi-media exhibition component, presents thought-provoking perspectives by forty contemporary artists who explore society’s hopes and aspirations for a free and just world. Highlighted among them is a suite of striking recreations by Maurice Pops Peterson, who presents a vision of Rockwell’s art for a new age.

The Unity Project images are on view at Norman Rockwell Museum as part of the Norman Rockwell: Imagining Freedom exhibition, starting on Saturday, October, 17, 2020.

Learn More
Rock the Vote

Norman Rockwell Museum has partnered with Rock the Vote to build awareness and encourage people to fulfill their civic obligation to vote.

The first step is making sure you are registered to vote.

Every State in the country has different deadlines for registering to vote and how you can vote.

Make sure you are aware of the election rules in your State.

VOTE.  Your future depends on it!

Days till the General Election

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IMAGE CREDITS

Mai Ly Degnan
Defend Democracy, 2020
Digital
Mai Ly Degnan © 2020. All rights reserved.

Rudy Gutierrez
Humanity, Not Politics, 2020
Acrylic, colored pencil, crayon on Bristol paper mounted on board
Rudy Gutierrez © 2020. All rights reserved.

Anita Kunz
Every Vote Counts
, 2020
Acrylic on board Anita Kunz
© 2020. All rights reserved.

Tim O’Brien
Vote
, 2020
Oil on board
Tim O’Brien © 2020. All rights reserved.

Whitney Sherman
Vote: Defend Democracy
, 2020
Digital
Whitney Sherman © 2020. All rights reserved.

Yuko Shimizu
Defend Democracy (Lady Liberty)
, 2020
Digital
Design by Atelier Olschinsky Grafik und Design OG
Yuko Shimizu © 2020. All rights reserved.

Norman Rockwell (1894-1978)
Freedom of Speech, 1943.
Illustration for The Saturday Evening Post, February 20, 1943.
From the collection of Norman Rockwell Museum.
© 1943 SEPS: Licensed by Curtis Licensing, Indianapolis, IN. All rights reserved.

Norman Rockwell. (1894-1978)
Rosie the Riveter, 1943
Cover illustration for The Saturday Evening Post, 1943
©1943 SEPS: Licensed by Curtis Licensing, Indianapolis, IN

Norman Rockwell (1894-1978)
Freedom of Worship, 1943.
Illustration for The Saturday Evening Post, February 27, 1943.
From the collection of Norman Rockwell Museum.
© 1943 SEPS: Licensed by Curtis Licensing, Indianapolis, IN. All rights reserved.

Norman Rockwell (1894-1978) 
Golden Rule, 1961.
Story illustration for The Saturday Evening Post, April 1, 1961.
Norman Rockwell Museum Collections.
©SEPS: Curtis Licensing, Indianapolis, IN.

Norman Rockwell (1894-1978)
Freedom From Want, 1943.
Illustration for The Saturday Evening Post, March, 6, 1943.
From the collection of Norman Rockwell Museum.
© 1943 SEPS: Licensed by Curtis Licensing, Indianapolis, IN. All rights reserved.

Norman Rockwell (1894-1978)
The Problem We All Live With, 1963.
Story illustration for Look, January 14, 1964
From the permanent collection of Norman Rockwell Museum
Licensed by Norman Rockwell Licensing Company, Niles, IL

Norman Rockwell (1894-1978)
Freedom From Fear, 1943.
Illustration for The Saturday Evening Post, March, 13, 1943.
From the collection of Norman Rockwell Museum.
© 1943 SEPS: Licensed by Curtis Licensing, Indianapolis, IN. All rights reserved.